Tesla Motors
TESLA MOTORS INC (Form: 10-Q, Received: 05/11/2015 06:14:01)

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2015

OR

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number: 001-34756

Tesla Motors, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

91-2197729

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

3500 Deer Creek Road

Palo Alto, California

 

94304

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(650) 681-5000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer

 

x

 

 

 

Accelerated filer

 

¨

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

¨

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Smaller reporting company

 

¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes   ¨     No   x

As of April 30, 2015, there were 126,403,793 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

TESLA MOTORS, INC.

FORM 10-Q FOR THE QUARTER ENDED MARCH 31, 2015

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I.

 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

4

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014

 

4

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

 

5

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

 

6

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015 and 2014

 

7

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

8

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

19

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

25

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

26

 

 

 

 

 

PART II.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

27

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

27

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

51

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

51

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

51

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

51

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

51

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

52

 

 

 

 


 

Forward-Looking Statements

The discussions in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contain forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements concerning our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, future profitability, future delivery of automobiles, projected costs, expectations regarding demand and acceptance for our technologies, growth opportunities and trends in the market in which we operate, prospects, plans and objectives of management and the statements made below under the heading “Management Opportunities, Challenges and Risks.” The words “anticipates”, “believes”, “estimates”, “expects”, “intends”, “may”, “plans”, “projects”, “will”, “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Actual results or events could differ materially from the plans, intentions and expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements that we make. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the risks set forth in Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements.

 

 

 

 


 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

I TEM 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Tesla Motors, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

1,510,076

 

 

$

1,905,713

 

Restricted cash and marketable securities

 

 

20,693

 

 

 

17,947

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

200,052

 

 

 

226,604

 

Inventory

 

 

1,054,840

 

 

 

953,675

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

135,756

 

 

 

94,718

 

Total current assets

 

 

2,921,417

 

 

 

3,198,657

 

Operating lease vehicles, net

 

 

912,061

 

 

 

766,744

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

 

2,224,191

 

 

 

1,829,267

 

Restricted cash

 

 

13,846

 

 

 

11,374

 

Other assets

 

 

48,515

 

 

 

43,209

 

Total assets

 

$

6,120,030

 

 

$

5,849,251

 

Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

732,331

 

 

$

777,946

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

353,768

 

 

 

268,884

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

226,474

 

 

 

191,651

 

Capital lease obligations, current portion

 

 

9,622

 

 

 

9,532

 

Customer deposits

 

 

249,476

 

 

 

257,587

 

Convertible senior notes and other debt

 

 

620,710

 

 

 

601,566

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

2,192,381

 

 

 

2,107,166

 

Capital lease obligations, less current portion

 

 

11,265

 

 

 

12,267

 

Deferred revenue, less current portion

 

 

312,850

 

 

 

292,271

 

Convertible senior notes and other debt, less current portion

 

 

1,888,672

 

 

 

1,806,518

 

Resale value guarantee

 

 

606,221

 

 

 

487,879

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

228,367

 

 

 

173,244

 

Total liabilities

 

 

5,239,756

 

 

 

4,879,345

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible senior notes (Notes 6)

 

 

54,277

 

 

 

58,196

 

Stockholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock; $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and

   outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock; $0.001 par value; 2,000,000,000 shares authorized as of

   March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively; 126,362,303 and

   125,687,607 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2015 and

   December 31, 2014, respectively

 

 

126

 

 

 

126

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

2,429,677

 

 

 

2,345,266

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(15,965

)

 

 

(22

)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(1,587,841

)

 

 

(1,433,660

)

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

825,997

 

 

 

911,710

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$

6,120,030

 

 

$

5,849,251

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

4


 

Tesla Motors, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automotive

 

$

893,320

 

 

$

588,871

 

Services and other

 

 

46,560

 

 

 

31,671

 

Total revenues

 

 

939,880

 

 

 

620,542

 

Cost of revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automotive

 

 

631,745

 

 

 

436,254

 

Services and other

 

 

48,062

 

 

 

29,160

 

Total cost of revenues

 

 

679,807

 

 

 

465,414

 

Gross profit

 

 

260,073

 

 

 

155,128

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

167,154

 

 

 

81,544

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

195,365

 

 

 

117,551

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

362,519

 

 

 

199,095

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(102,446

)

 

 

(43,967

)

Interest income

 

 

184

 

 

 

141

 

Interest expense

 

 

(26,574

)

 

 

(11,883

)

Other income (expense), net

 

 

(22,305

)

 

 

6,718

 

Loss before income taxes

 

 

(151,141

)

 

 

(48,991

)

Provision for income taxes

 

 

3,040

 

 

 

809

 

Net loss

 

$

(154,181

)

 

$

(49,800

)

Net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted

 

$

(1.22

)

 

$

(0.40

)

Weighted average shares used in computing net loss per share of common stock, basic

   and diluted

 

 

125,946,657

 

 

 

123,472,782

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

5


 

Tesla Motors, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss

(in thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net loss

 

$

(154,181

)

 

$

(49,800

)

Other comprehensive loss, net of tax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized net gain on short-term marketable securities

 

 

204

 

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 

(16,147

)

 

 

 

Other comprehensive loss

 

 

(15,943

)

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(170,124

)

 

$

(49,800

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

6


 

Tesla Motors, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(in thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Cash Flows From Operating Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(154,181

)

 

$

(49,800

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

77,112

 

 

 

44,268

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

43,026

 

 

 

37,038

 

Amortization of discount on convertible debt

 

 

17,941

 

 

 

8,493

 

Inventory write-downs

 

 

5,901

 

 

 

1,578

 

Fixed asset disposal

 

 

2,753

 

 

 

 

Other non-cash operating activities

 

 

2,862

 

 

 

2,561

 

Foreign currency transaction (gain) loss

 

 

27,977

 

 

 

(1,909

)

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

2,175

 

 

 

(23,721

)

Inventories and operating lease vehicles

 

 

(307,209

)

 

 

(198,594

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(43,475

)

 

 

(11,429

)

Other assets

 

 

(6,055

)

 

 

153

 

Accounts payable

 

 

(43,242

)

 

 

78,257

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

90,735

 

 

 

19,280

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

50,729

 

 

 

50,394

 

Customer deposits

 

 

(3,012

)

 

 

34,981

 

Resale value guarantee

 

 

62,712

 

 

 

54,318

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

41,457

 

 

 

12,855

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

 

(131,794

)

 

 

58,723

 

Cash Flows From Investing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment excluding capital leases

 

 

(426,060

)

 

 

(141,364

)

(Increase) decrease in other restricted cash

 

 

(6,284

)

 

 

1,295

 

Purchases of short-term marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

(189,111

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(432,344

)

 

 

(329,180

)

Cash Flows From Financing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collateralized lease borrowing

 

 

77,961

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of convertible and other debt

 

 

77,661

 

 

 

2,000,000

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options and other stock issuances

 

 

35,218

 

 

 

35,726

 

Principal payments on capital leases and other debt

 

 

(3,726

)

 

 

(2,545

)

Common stock and convertible other debt issuance costs

 

 

(958

)

 

 

(30,302

)

Proceeds from issuance of warrants

 

 

 

 

 

338,400

 

Purchase of convertible note hedges

 

 

 

 

 

(524,720

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

186,156

 

 

 

1,816,559

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(17,655

)

 

 

1,917

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(395,637

)

 

 

1,548,019

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

 

1,905,713

 

 

 

845,889

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

$

1,510,076

 

 

$

2,393,908

 

Supplemental noncash investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of property and equipment included in accounts payable and accrued

   liabilities

 

 

235,582

 

 

 

36,835

 

Estimated fair market value of facilities under build-to-suit lease

 

 

29,212

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

7


 

Tesla Motors, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

1. Overview of the Company

Tesla Motors, Inc. (Tesla, we, us or our) was incorporated in the state of Delaware on July 1, 2003. We design, develop, manufacture and sell high-performance fully electric vehicles, advanced electric vehicle powertrain components, and energy storage applications. We have wholly-owned subsidiaries in North America, Europe and Asia. The primary purpose of these subsidiaries is to market, manufacture, sell and/or service our vehicles.

 

 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Consolidation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Tesla and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant inter-company transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period, including revenue recognition, residual value of operating lease vehicles, inventory valuation, warranties, fair value of financial instruments and stock-based compensation. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Unaudited Interim Financial Statements

The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2015, the condensed consolidated statements of operations and condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 and the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 and other information disclosed in the related notes are unaudited. The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2014 was derived from our audited consolidated financial statements at that date. The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes contained in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements and related disclosures have been prepared on the same basis as the annual consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results of operations for the periods presented. The condensed consolidated results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or for any other future year or interim period.

Beginning in the three months ended March 31, 2015, we changed the composition of the revenue and cost of revenue lines in our statements of operations. Automotive includes revenues related to deliveries of new Model S, including vehicle options, data connectivity, and Supercharging, sales of regulatory credits to other automotive manufacturers, amortization of revenue for cars sold with resale value guarantees, Model S leasing revenue, and scrap sales. Services and other consists of sales of electric vehicle powertrain components and systems to other manufacturers, maintenance and development services, Tesla Energy, and pre-owned Tesla vehicle sales. Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

Beginning January 1, 2015, the functional currency of each of our foreign subsidiaries changed to the local country’s currency. This change was based on the culmination of facts and circumstances that have developed as we expanded our foreign operations over the past year. The adjustment of $10.0 million attributable to the current rate translation of non-monetary assets as of the date of the change is included in accumulated other comprehensive loss on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2015.

During the three months ended June 30, 2014, we began separately presenting the effect of exchange rate changes on our cash and cash equivalents in our condensed consolidated statements of cash flows due to our growing operations in foreign currency environments. Prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

8


 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued an accounting update which amends the existing accounting standards for revenue recognition. The new guidance provides a unified model to determine when and how revenue is recognized. Under the new model, revenue is recognized as goods or services are delivered in an amount that reflects the consideration we expect to collect. The guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016; early adoption is prohibited. The new standard is required to be applied retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying it recognized at the date of initial application. We have not yet selected a transition method and are currently evaluating the impact of adopting this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

We recognize revenues from sales of Model S and the Tesla Roadster, including vehicle options and accessories, vehicle service and sales of regulatory credits, such as zero emission vehicle and greenhouse gas emission credits, as well as sales of electric vehicle powertrain components and systems, such as battery packs and drive units. We recognize revenue when: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (ii) delivery has occurred and there are no uncertainties regarding customer acceptance; (iii) fees are fixed or determinable; and (iv) collection is reasonably assured.

Car sales include certain standard features and customer selected options and configurations that meet the definition of a deliverable under multiple-element accounting guidance, including internet connectivity, Supercharging access, and specified software updates for cars equipped with Autopilot hardware. These deliverables are valued on a stand-alone basis and we recognize their related revenue over our performance period which is generally the eight-year life of the car or, for software upgrades, as they are delivered. If we sell a deliverable separately, we use that pricing to determine its fair value; otherwise, we use our best estimated selling price by considering third party pricing of similar options, costs used to develop and deliver the service, and other information which may be available.

As of March 31, 2015, we had deferred $43.8 million, $29.1 million, $16.7 million, and $1.2 million related to the purchase of vehicle maintenance and service plans, access to our Supercharger network, Model S connectivity, and Autopilot software upgrades. As of December 31, 2014, we had deferred $39.7 million, $25.6 million, $14.4 million, and $1.5 million related to these same performance obligations.

Resale Value Guarantees

We offer resale value guarantees or similar buy-back terms to all customers who purchase a Model S in the US, Canada and selected European and Asian markets and finance their vehicle through one of our specified commercial banking partners. Under the program, Model S customers have the option of selling their vehicle back to us during the period of 36 to 39 months after delivery for a pre-determined resale value. Although we receive full payment for the vehicle sales price at the time of delivery, we account for transactions under the resale value guarantee program as operating leases. Accordingly, we defer revenue on the sale of the vehicle to deferred revenue and residual value guarantee and recognize revenue attributable to the lease on a straight-line basis over the guarantee period to automotive revenue. Similarly, we capitalize the cost of the leased vehicle and depreciate its value, less expected salvage value, to cost of automotive revenue over the same period.

At the end of the resale value guarantee period, which is the earlier of 39 months or the pay-off date of the initial loan, the resale value guarantee and deferred revenue balances are settled to automotive revenue and the net book value of the leased vehicle is expensed to costs of automotive revenue if our customer retains ownership of the car.  In cases where a customer returns the vehicle back to us between months 36 and 39, we purchase the car in the amount of the resale value guarantee and settle any remaining deferred revenue balance to automotive revenue.

In the fourth quarter of 2014, Tesla also began offering resale value guarantees in connection with automobile sales to certain bank leasing partners. As Tesla has guaranteed the value of these vehicles and as the vehicles are expected to be leased to end-customers, we account for them as collateralized borrowings. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, we had $76.7 million and $19.6 million of such borrowings recorded in resale value guarantee and $17.2 million and $0 million recorded in deferred revenue liability, of which a portion will be accreted to revenue and a portion may be distributed to the bank leasing partner should we decide to repurchase the vehicles at the end of the term or should the bank sell the car to a third party and receive proceeds less than the value we have guaranteed. The maximum cash payment to re-purchase these vehicles under these arrangements at March 31, 2015, is $55.4 million. Cash received upon the sale of such cars is classified as collateralized lease borrowing within cash flows from financing activities in our Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows.

9


 

Account activity related to our resale value guarantee program consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Operating Lease Vehicles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease vehicles under the resale value guarantee

   program—beginning of period

 

$

684,590

 

 

$

376,979

 

Net increase in operating lease vehicles under the resale value

   guarantee program

 

 

139,791

 

 

 

84,515

 

Depreciation expense recorded in cost of automotive revenues

 

 

(22,041

)

 

 

(12,402

)

Additional depreciation expense recorded in cost of

   automotive revenues as a result of early cancellation of resale

   value guarantee

 

 

(4,396

)

 

 

(2,060

)

Reclassifications to inventory resulting from return of vehicle under trade-in program

 

 

(5,233

)

 

 

 

Operating lease vehicles under the resale value guarantee

   program—end of period

 

$

792,711

 

 

$

447,032

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue related to the resale value guarantee

   program—beginning of period

 

$

381,096

 

 

$

230,856

 

Net increase in deferred revenue including Model S deliveries with resale value

   guarantee and reclassification of collateralized borrowing from long-term to short-term

 

 

91,694

 

 

 

63,070

 

Amortization of deferred revenue and short-term collateralized borrowing recorded in

   automotive revenue

 

 

(44,980

)

 

 

(21,779

)

Additional revenue recorded in automotive revenue as a

   result of early cancellation of resale value guarantee

 

 

(909

)

 

 

(1,441

)

Release of deferred revenue resulting from return of vehicle under trade-in program

 

 

(2,797

)

 

 

 

Deferred revenue related to the resale value guarantee

   program—end of period

 

$

424,104

 

 

$

270,706

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resale Value Guarantee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resale value guarantee liability—beginning of period

 

$

487,879

 

 

$

236,298

 

Net increase in resale value guarantee

 

 

124,112

 

 

 

55,602

 

Reclassification from long-term to short-term collateralized borrowing

 

 

(644

)

 

 

 

Additional revenue recorded in automotive revenue as a

   result of early cancellation of resale value guarantee

 

 

(1,070

)

 

 

(1,283

)

Release of resale value guarantee resulting from return of vehicle under trade-in program

 

 

(4,056

)

 

 

 

Resale value guarantee liability—end of period

 

$

606,221

 

 

$

290,617

 

Model S Leasing Program

In April 2014, we began offering a leasing program in the United States and Canada for Model S. Qualifying customers are permitted to lease a Model S for 36 months, after which time they have the option of either returning the vehicle to us or purchasing it for a pre-determined residual value. We account for these leasing transactions as operating leases and accordingly, we recognize leasing revenues over the contractual term of the individual leases and record cost of automotive revenues equal to the depreciation of the leased vehicles. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, we had deferred $14.8 million and $9.4 million of lease-related upfront payments which will be recognized on a straight-line basis over the contractual term of the individual leases. Lease revenues are recorded in automotive revenue and for the three months ended March 31, 2015, we recognized $6.6 million.

Warranties

We provide a warranty on all vehicles, production powertrain components and systems sales, and we accrue warranty reserves upon delivery to the customer. Warranty reserves include management’s best estimate of the projected costs to repair or to replace items under warranty. These estimates are based on actual claims incurred to-date and an estimate of the nature, frequency and costs of future claims. These estimates are inherently uncertain and changes to our historical or projected experience may cause material changes to our warranty reserves in the future. The portion of the warranty provision expected to be incurred within 12 months is classified as current within accrued liabilities, while the remaining amount is classified as long-term within other long-term liabilities.

10


 

Accrued warranty activity consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended  March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Accrued warranty—beginning of period

 

$

129,043

 

 

$

53,182

 

Warranty costs incurred

 

 

(11,786

)

 

 

(9,300

)

Net changes in liability for pre-existing warranties, including

   expirations

 

 

10,762

 

 

 

8,120

 

Provision for warranty

 

 

27,282

 

 

 

19,930

 

Accrued warranty—end of period

 

$

155,301

 

 

$

71,932

 

Our warranty reserves do not include projected warranty costs associated with our operating lease vehicles and vehicles sold with resale value guarantee and similar buy-back terms as such actual warranty costs are expensed as incurred. For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, warranty costs incurred for our operating lease vehicles were $1.8 million and $1.2 million. Warranty expense is recorded as a component of cost of automotive revenue.

Cost of automotive revenue during the first quarter of 2015 also included a $10.7 million increase to our warranty reserve to reflect the additional preventative repairs we plan to perform on customer drive units and high-voltage battery packs when brought in for warranty related service.

Inventory Valuation

We value our inventories at the lower of cost or market. Cost is computed using standard cost, which approximates actual cost on a first-in, first-out basis. We record inventory write-downs for estimated obsolescence or unmarketable inventories based upon assumptions about future demand forecasts. If our inventory on hand is in excess of our future demand forecast, the excess amounts are written off.

We also review inventory to determine whether its carrying value exceeds the net amount realizable upon the ultimate sale of the inventory. This requires us to determine the estimated selling price of our vehicles less the estimated cost to convert inventory on hand into a finished product.  Should our estimates of future selling prices or production costs change, material changes to these reserves may be required. A small change in our estimates may result in a material charge to our reported financial results.

Concentration of Risk

Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject us to a concentration of credit risk consist of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and accounts receivable. Our cash equivalents are primarily invested in money market funds with high credit quality financial institutions in the United States. At times, these deposits and securities may be in excess of insured limits. We invest cash not required for use in operations in high credit quality securities based on our investment policy. Our investment policy provides guidelines and limits regarding credit quality, investment concentration, investment type, and maturity that we believe will provide liquidity while reducing risk of loss of capital. Our investments are currently of a short-term nature and include U.S. treasury bills.

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, our accounts receivable were derived primarily from amounts to be received from financial institutions and leasing companies offering various financing products to our customers, sales of regulatory credits, as well as the development and sales of powertrain components and systems to automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). As of March 31, 2015, we have two customers who individually account for 23% and 10% of our accounts receivable.

Supply Risk

Although there may be multiple suppliers available, many of the components used in our vehicles are purchased by us from a single source. If these single source suppliers fail to satisfy our requirements on a timely basis at competitive prices, we could suffer manufacturing delays, a possible loss of revenues, or incur higher cost of sales, any of which could adversely affect our operating results.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

We use the fair value method of accounting for our stock options and restricted stock units (RSUs) granted to employees and our Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP) to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for the stock-based awards. The fair value of stock options and ESPP are estimated on the grant date and offering date using the Black-Scholes option-pricing

11


 

model. The fair value of RSUs is measured on the grant date based on the closing fair market value of our common stock. The resulting cost is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for the awards, usually the vesting period which is generally four years for stock options and RSUs and six months for the ESPP. Stock-based compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis, net of estimated forfeitures.

Net Loss per Share of Common Stock

Our basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock is calculated by dividing net loss by the weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding for the period. Potentially dilutive shares, which are based on the number of shares underlying outstanding stock options and warrants as well as our convertible senior notes, are not included when their effect is antidilutive.

The following table presents the potential weighted common shares outstanding that were excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share of common stock for the periods presented. Anti-dilutive share counts for the twelve months ended December 31, 2014 have been updated.

 

 

 

Three Months Ended  March 31,

 

 

Twelve Months

Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2014

 

Employee share based awards

 

 

15,711,086

 

 

 

14,288,189

 

 

 

14,729,749

 

Convertible senior notes

 

 

2,040,822

 

 

 

2,015,267

 

 

 

2,344,998

 

Warrants issued May 2013

 

 

471,339

 

 

 

433,479

 

 

 

921,985

 

Since we expect to settle the principal amount of our outstanding convertible senior notes in cash, we use the treasury stock method for calculating any potential dilutive effect of the conversion spread on diluted net income per share, if applicable. The conversion spread will have a dilutive impact on diluted net income per share of common stock when the average market price of our common stock for a given period exceeds the conversion price of $124.52, $359.87 and $359.87 per share for the 2018 Notes, 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes.

Uncertain Tax Positions

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the aggregate balances of our gross unrecognized tax benefits were $47.8 million and $41.4 million, of which $45.2 million and $39.1 million,  would not affect our effective tax rate as the tax benefits would increase a deferred tax asset which is currently offset by a full valuation allowance.

 

 

3. Balance Sheet Components

Inventory

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, our inventory consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Raw materials

 

$

370,553

 

 

$

392,292

 

Work in process

 

 

63,058

 

 

 

56,114

 

Finished goods

 

 

492,645

 

 

 

397,318

 

Service parts

 

 

128,584

 

 

 

107,951

 

Total

 

$

1,054,840

 

 

$

953,675

 

Finished goods inventory includes vehicles in transit to fulfill customer orders, vehicles used for marketing purposes and service loaners, until they are sold to customers, new vehicles available for immediate sale at our retail and service center locations, and pre-owned Tesla vehicles.  The increase in finished goods inventory was primarily due to customer orders that were in transit for delivery at quarter-end while there was a reduction in the new vehicles available for immediate sale.  

12


 

Property, Plant and Equipment

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, our property, plant and equipment, net, consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Machinery, equipment and office furniture

 

$

819,794

 

 

$

720,746

 

Construction in progress

 

 

763,628

 

 

 

572,125

 

Leasehold improvements

 

 

310,235

 

 

 

230,270

 

Tooling

 

 

308,082

 

 

 

295,906

 

Building and building improvements

 

 

198,024

 

 

 

154,362

 

Computer equipment and software

 

 

114,824

 

 

 

98,970

 

Land

 

 

51,990

 

 

 

49,478

 

 

 

 

2,566,577

 

 

 

2,121,857

 

Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

 

(342,386

)

 

 

(292,590

)

Total

 

$

2,224,191

 

 

$

1,829,267

 

Construction in progress is comprised primarily of assets related to the manufacturing of our Model S, including building improvements at our Tesla Factory in Fremont, California, Gigafactory construction, tooling and manufacturing equipment and capitalized interest expense. Depreciation of construction in progress begins when the assets are ready for their intended use. Interest expense on outstanding debt is capitalized during the period of significant capital asset construction. Capitalized interest on construction in progress is included in property, plant and equipment, and is amortized over the life of the related assets. During the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, we capitalized $8.3 million and $1.2 million of interest expense.

We are sometimes involved in construction at our leased facilities. In accordance with Accounting Standards Codification 840, Leases , for build-to-suit lease arrangements where we are involved in the construction of structural improvements prior to the commencement of the lease or take some level of construction risk, we are considered the owner of the assets during the construction period. Accordingly, upon commencement of our construction activities, we record a construction in progress asset and a corresponding financing liability. Once the construction is completed, if the lease meets certain “sale-leaseback” criteria, we will remove the asset and related financial obligation from the balance sheet and treat the building lease as an operating lease. If upon completion of construction, the project does not meet the “sale-leaseback” criteria, the leased property will be treated as a capital lease for financial reporting purposes and included in building and building improvements in the table above. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the table above includes $61.5 million and $52.4 million of build-to-suit assets. As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, corresponding financing obligations of $0 million and $21.0 million are recorded in accrued liabilities and $61.3 million and $31.4 million are recorded in other long-term liabilities.

Depreciation and amortization expense during the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 were $52.1 million and $28.9 million. Total property and equipment assets under capital lease as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014 were $34.8 million and $33.4 million. Accumulated depreciation related to assets under capital lease as of these dates were $14.7 million and $12.8 million.

We have acquired land for the site of our Gigafactory and have incurred$146.2 million of construction costs as of March 31, 2015.

Accrued Liabilities

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, our accrued liabilities consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Taxes payable

 

$

83,739

 

 

$

71,229

 

Accrued purchases

 

 

146,952

 

 

 

68,547

 

Payroll and related costs

 

 

66,544

 

 

 

54,492

 

Other

 

 

56,533

 

 

 

74,616

 

Total

 

$

353,768

 

 

$

268,884

 

 

 

13


 

4. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying values of our financial instruments including cash equivalents, marketable securities, accounts receivable and accounts payable approximate their fair value due to their short-term nature. As a basis for determining the fair value of certain of our assets and liabilities, we established a three-tier fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows: (Level I) observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; (Level II) inputs other than the quoted prices in active markets that are observable either directly or indirectly; and (Level III) unobservable inputs in which there is little or no market data which requires us to develop our own assumptions. This hierarchy requires us to use observable market data, when available, and to minimize the use of unobservable inputs when determining fair value. Our financial assets that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis consist of cash equivalents and marketable securities.

All of our cash equivalents and current restricted cash, which are comprised primarily of money market funds, are classified within Level I of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices or market prices for similar securities. Our restricted short-term marketable securities are classified within Level I of the fair value hierarchy.

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the fair value hierarchy for our financial assets that are carried at fair value was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31, 2015

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Level I

 

 

Level II

 

 

Level III

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Level I

 

 

Level II

 

 

Level   III

 

Money market funds

 

$

874,305

 

 

$

874,305

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

1,275,346

 

 

$

1,275,346

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

U.S. treasury bills

 

 

16,682

 

 

 

16,682

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16,673

 

 

 

16,673

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

890,987

 

 

$

890,987

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

1,292,019

 

 

$

1,292,019

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Our available-for-sale marketable securities classified by security type as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014 consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31, 2015

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair   Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair   Value

 

U.S. treasury bills

 

$

16,478

 

 

$

204

 

 

$

 

 

$

16,682

 

 

$

16,695

 

 

$

 

 

$

(22

)

 

$

16,673

 

As of March 31, 2015, the estimated fair value of our 2018 Notes, 2019 Notes, and 2021 Notes was $1.06 billion (par value $659.8 million), $807.3 million (par value $920.0 million), and $1.17 billion (par value $1.38 billion). As of December 31, 2014 the estimated fair value of our 2018 Notes, 2019 Notes, and 2021 Notes was $1.22 billion (par value $659.8 million), $852.2 million (par value $920.0 million), and $1.25 billion (par value $1.38 billion). These fair values represent level II valuations. When determining the estimated fair value of our long-term debt, we used a commonly accepted valuation methodology and market-based risk measurements that are indirectly observable, such as credit risk. As of March 31, 2015, the $77.7 million carrying value of our Warehouse Facility liability approximates the fair value.

 

 

5. Customer Deposits

We collect deposits from customers at the time they place an order for a vehicle and, in some locations, at certain additional milestones up to the point of delivery. Customer deposit amounts and timing vary depending on the vehicle model and country of delivery. Customer deposits related to Model X currently represent fully refundable reservations. Customer deposits are included in current liabilities until refunded or until they are applied to a customer’s purchase balance at time of delivery.

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, we held customer deposits of $249.5 million and $257.6 million.

 

 

6. Convertible and Long-term Debt Obligations

0.25% and 1.25% Convertible Senior Notes and Bond Hedge and Warrant Transactions

In March 2014, we issued $800.0 million principal amount of 0.25% convertible senior notes due 2019 (2019 Notes) and $1.20 billion principal amount of 1.25% convertible senior notes due 2021 (2021 Notes) in a public offering. In April 2014, we issued an additional $120.0 million aggregate principal amount of 2019 Notes and $180.0 million aggregate principal amount of 2021 Notes, pursuant to the exercise in full of the overallotment options of the underwriters of our March 2014 public offering. Each $1,000 of principal of the 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes will initially be convertible into 2.7788 shares of our common stock, which is equivalent

14


 

to an initial conversion price of approximately $359.87 per share, subject to adjustment upon the occurrence of specified events. The total net proceeds from these offerings, after deducting transaction costs, were approximately $905.8 million from 2019 Notes and $1.36 billion from 2021 Notes. We incurred $14.2 million and $21.4 million, of debt issuance costs in connection with the 2019 Notes and the 2021 Notes, which we initially recorded in other assets and are amortizing to interest expense using the effective interest method over the contractual terms of these notes. The interest rates are fixed at 0.25% and 1.25% per annum and are payable semi-annually in arrears on March 1 and September 1 of each year, commencing on September 1, 2014.

In connection with the offering of these notes in March 2014, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions whereby we have the option to purchase initially (subject to adjustment for certain specified events) a total of approximately 5.6 million shares of our common stock at a price of approximately $359.87 per share. The total cost of the convertible note hedge transactions was $524.7 million. In addition, we sold warrants whereby the holders of the warrants have the option to purchase initially (subject to adjustment for certain specified events) a total of approximately 2.2 million shares of our common stock at a price of $512.66 for the 2019 Notes and a total of approximately 3.3 million shares of our common stock at a price of $560.64 per share for 2021 Notes. We received $338.4 million in cash proceeds from the sale of these warrants. Similarly, in connection with the issuance of additional notes in April 2014, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions and paid an aggregate $78.7 million. In addition, we sold warrants to purchase (subject to adjustment for certain specified events) a total of approximately 0.3 million shares of our common stock at a strike price of $512.66 per share for the warrants relating to 2019 Notes, and a total of approximately 0.5 million shares of our common stock at a strike price of $560.64 per share for the warrants relating to 2021 Notes. We received aggregate proceeds of approximately $50.8 million from the sale of the warrants. Taken together, the purchase of the convertible note hedges and the sale of warrants are intended to offset any actual dilution from the conversion of these notes and to effectively increase the overall conversion price from $359.87 to $512.66 per share in the case of warrants relating to 2019 Notes and from $359.87 to $560.64 in the case of warrants relating to 2021 Notes. As these transactions meet certain accounting criteria, the convertible note hedges and warrants are recorded in stockholders’ equity and are not accounted for as derivatives. The net cost incurred in connection with the convertible note hedge and warrant transactions was recorded as a reduction to additional paid-in capital on the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

During the first quarter of 2015, the closing price of our common stock did not meet or exceed 130% of the applicable conversion price of our 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes on at least 20 of the last 30 consecutive trading days of the quarter; furthermore, no other conditions allowing holders of the 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes to convert have been met as of March 31, 2015. Therefore, the 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes are not convertible during the second quarter of 2015 and are classified as long-term debt. Should the closing price conditions be met in the second quarter of 2015 or a future quarter, the 2019 Notes and 2021 Notes will be convertible at their holders’ option during the immediately following quarters.

1.50% Convertible Senior Notes and Bond Hedge and Warrant Transactions

In May 2013, we issued $660.0 million aggregate principal amount of convertible senior notes due 2018 (2018 Notes) in a public offering. The net proceeds from the offering, after deducting transaction costs, were approximately $648.0 million. We incurred $12.0 million of debt issuance costs in connection with 2018 Notes which we initially recorded in other assets and are amortizing to interest expense using the effective interest method over the contractual term of 2018 Notes. Each $1,000 of principal of the 2018 Notes will initially be convertible into 8.0306 shares of our common stock, which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $124.52 per share, subject to adjustment upon the occurrence of specified events. The interest under 2018 Notes is fixed at 1.50% per annum and is payable semi-annually in arrears on June 1 and December 1 of each year, commencing on December 1, 2013.

In connection with the offering of the 2018 Notes, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions whereby we have the option to purchase initially (subject to adjustment for certain specified events) a total of approximately 5.3 million shares of our common stock at a price of approximately $124.52 per share. The cost of the convertible note hedge transactions was $177.5 million. In addition, we sold warrants whereby the holders of the warrants have the option to purchase initially (subject to adjustment for certain specified events) a total of approximately 5.3 million shares of our common stock at a price of $184.48 per share. We received $120.3 million in cash proceeds from the sale of these warrants. Taken together, the purchase of the convertible note hedges and the sale of warrants are intended to offset any actual dilution from the conversion of the 2018 Notes and to effectively increase the overall conversion price from $124.52 to $184.48 per share. As these transactions meet certain accounting criteria, the convertible note hedges and warrants are recorded in stockholders’ equity and are not accounted for as derivatives. The net cost incurred in connection with the convertible note hedge and warrant transactions was recorded as a reduction to additional paid-in capital in the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

15


 

During the first quarter of 2015, the closing price of our common stock exceeded 130% of the applicable conversion price of our 2018 Notes on at least 20 of the last 30 consecutive trading days of the quarter; therefore, holders of 2018 Notes may convert their notes during the second quarter of 2015. As such, we classified the $605.5 million carrying value of our 2018 Notes as current liabilities and classified $54.3 million, representing the difference between the aggregate principal of our 2018 Notes of $659.8 million and the carrying value of 2018 Notes, as mezzanine equity on our condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2015. Similarly, debt issuance costs were classified as other current assets as of March 31, 2015. Should the closing price conditions be met in the second quarter of 2015 or a future quarter, 2018 Notes will be convertible at their holders’ option during the immediately following quarter.

Convertible Senior Notes Carrying Value and Interest Expense

In accordance with accounting guidance on embedded conversion features, we valued and bifurcated the conversion option associated with the notes from the respective host debt instrument and initially recorded the conversion option for the 2018, 2019, and 2021 Notes in stockholders’ equity. The resulting debt discounts on the 2019 Notes, 2021 Notes, and 2018 Notes are being amortized to interest expense at the effective interest rate over the contractual terms of the notes.

 

 

 

March 31, 2015

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

 

 

2018 Notes

 

 

2019 Notes

 

 

2021 Notes

 

 

2018 Notes

 

 

2019 Notes

 

 

2021 Notes

 

 

 

(in thousands, except years and percentages)

 

Carrying value

 

$

605,485

 

 

$

768,488

 

 

$

1,057,749

 

 

$

601,566

 

 

$

759,891

 

 

$

1,046,627

 

Unamortized discount

 

 

54,277

 

 

 

151,512

 

 

 

322,251

 

 

 

58,196

 

 

 

160,109

 

 

 

333,373

 

Principal amount

 

$

659,762

 

 

$

920,000

 

 

$

1,380,000

 

 

$

659,762

 

 

$

920,000

 

 

$

1,380,000

 

Remaining amortization period (years)

 

 

2.9

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

5.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effective interest rate on liability component

 

 

4.29

%

 

 

4.89

%

 

 

5.96

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrying amount of equity component

 

$

82,800

 

 

$

188,100

 

 

$

369,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If converted value in excess of par value

 

$

340,432

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warehouse line of credit

In March 2015, we entered into a loan and security agreement (the “Warehouse Facility”) for a secured asset based line of credit for a principal amount up to $100 million. Obligations under the Warehouse Facility are secured on a first priority basis by certain of our direct lease contracts and the related lease vehicles. We sell the lease contracts and related vehicles to a wholly owned, bankruptcy-remote, special purpose entity that transfers an ownership interest in these assets, but not the assets themselves, to third-party lenders. Borrowings under the Warehouse Facility are generally limited to up to 72% of the present value of the remaining lease payments and the residual vehicle values under eligible lease contracts. As of March 31, 2015, we have borrowed $77 million under the Warehouse Facility.

Interest is payable monthly on amounts borrowed under the Warehouse Facility at a variable rate of LIBOR plus 1.65% and on undrawn amounts at a rate of 0.5%.  The Warehouse facility matures in March 2017, at which time all outstanding borrowing will become due. Prior to that date, principal payments will be due in the amount that the borrowing limit decreases below our outstanding principal balance.

Interest Expense

The following table presents the aggregate amount of interest expense recognized on the warehouse line of credit, 2018 Notes, 2019 Notes, and 2021 Notes relating to the contractual interest coupon and amortization of the debt issuance costs and debt discount.

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Contractual interest coupon

 

$

7,307

 

 

$

3,652

 

Amortization of debt issuance costs

 

 

1,530

 

 

 

736

 

Amortization of debt discount

 

 

23,638

 

 

 

8,492

 

Total

 

$

32,475

 

 

$

12,880

 

 

 

16


 

7. Equity Incentive Plans

Performance-based Stock Option Grant

In 2014, to create incentives for continued long term success beyond the Model S program and to closely align executive pay with our stockholders’ interests in the achievement of significant milestones by our company, the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors granted stock options to certain employees to purchase 1,073,000 shares of our common stock. Each such grant consists of four vesting tranches with a vesting schedule based entirely on the attainment of future performance milestones, assuming continued employment and service to us through each vesting date.

·

1/4th of the shares subject to the options are scheduled to vest upon completion of the first Model X Production Vehicle;

·

1/4th of the shares subject to the options are scheduled to vest upon achieving aggregate vehicle production of 100,000 vehicles in a trailing 12-month period;

·

1/4th of the shares subject to the options are scheduled to vest upon completion of the first Gen III Production Vehicle; and

·

1/4th of the shares subject to the options are scheduled to vest upon achievement of annualized gross margin of greater than 30.0% in any three years.

As of March 31, 2015, the following performance milestone was considered probable of achievement.

·

Completion of the first Model X Production Vehicle.

For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, we recorded stock-based compensation expense of $3.7 million and $2.9 million related to this grant, respectively.

2012 CEO Grant

In August 2012, our Board of Directors granted 5,274,901 stock options to our CEO (2012 CEO Grant). The 2012 CEO Grant consists of ten vesting tranches with a vesting schedule based entirely on the attainment of both performance conditions and market conditions, assuming continued employment and service to us through each vesting date.

Each of the ten vesting tranches requires a combination of one of the ten pre-determined performance milestones and an incremental increase in our market capitalization of $4.0 billion, as compared to the initial market capitalization of $3.2 billion measured at the time of the 2012 CEO Grant.

As of March 31, 2015, the market conditions for six vesting tranches and the following performance milestone were achieved and approved by our Board of Directors:

·

Successful completion of the Model X Alpha Prototype.

·

Successful completion of the Model X Beta Prototype;

As of March 31, 2015, the following three performance milestones were considered probable of achievement:

·

Completion of the first Model X Production Vehicle;

·

Successful completion of the Model 3 Alpha Prototype; and

·

Aggregate vehicle production of 100,000 vehicles.

For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, we recorded stock-based compensation expense of $1.4 million and $10.0 million related to this grant, respectively.

No cash compensation has been received by our CEO for his services to the company.

17


 

Summary Stock-Based Compensation Information

The following table summarizes our stock-based compensation expense by line item in the condensed consolidated statements of operations (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Cost of sales

 

$

4,601

 

 

$

3,106

 

Research and development

 

 

19,792

 

 

 

13,545

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

18,633

 

 

 

20,387

 

Total

 

$

43,026

 

 

$

37,038

 

 

 

8. Commitments and Contingencies

Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we are subject to various legal proceedings that arise from the normal course of business activities. In addition, from time to time, third parties may assert intellectual property infringement claims against us in the form of letters and other forms of communication. If an unfavorable ruling were to occur, there exists the possibility of a material adverse impact on our results of operations, prospects, cash flows, financial position and brand.

In November 2013, a putative securities class action lawsuit was filed against Tesla in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, alleging violations of, and seeking remedies pursuant to, Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5. The complaint, made claims against Tesla and its CEO, Elon Musk, sought damages and attorney’s fees on the basis of allegations that, among other things, Tesla and Mr. Musk made false and/or misleading representations and omissions, including with respect to the safety of Model S. This case was brought on behalf of a putative class consisting of certain persons who purchased Tesla’s securities between August 19, 2013 and November 17, 2013. On September 26, 2014, the trial court, upon the motion of Tesla and Mr. Musk, dismissed the complaint with prejudice, and thereafter issued a formal written order to that effect. The plaintiffs have appealed from the trial court’s order, and that appeal is pending.

 

 

 

18


 

I TEM   2.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this Form 10-Q.

Overview and Quarter Highlights

We design, develop, manufacture and sell high-performance fully electric vehicles, advanced electric vehicle powertrain components and energy storage applications. We are currently producing and selling our second vehicle, the Model S sedan. Model S is a four door, five-passenger premium sedan that offers exceptional performance, functionality and attractive styling. Model S inherited many of the electric powertrain innovations we introduced with our first vehicle, the Tesla Roadster. We commenced deliveries of Model S in June 2012 and have delivered over 66,000 vehicles through March 31, 2015. In 2014 we announced the availability of our All-Wheel Drive Model S and began delivery, starting with a performance-optimized version, in December 2014. Since then we have announced a 70 kWh All-Wheel Drive Model S and discontinued the 60 kWh Model S.

We are continuing to develop our Model X crossover vehicle and intend to commence customer deliveries late in the third quarter of 2015. After the Model X, our goal is to introduce Model 3, a lower priced sedan designed for the mass market, in 2017.

Our primary source of revenue is from the sale of our vehicles. During the three months ended March 31, 2015, we recognized total revenues of $939.9 million, an increase of $319.3 million over total revenues of $620.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014, primarily driven by growth of Model S deliveries worldwide.

Gross margin for the three months ended March 31, 2015 was 27.7%, an increase from 25.0% for the three months ended March 31, 2014. Higher vehicle production volume, manufacturing efficiencies and vehicle cost reductions, combined with favorable product mix, contributed to higher gross margin in the first quarter of 2015, despite the strengthening of the U.S. dollar which affected our revenue from sales in foreign markets.

Research and development (R&D) expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $167.2 million, an increase from $81.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. Higher R&D expenses in the first quarter of 2015 reflected our growing engineering work on Model X as well as efforts to develop the right hand drive All-Wheel Drive Model S.

We continue to increase our sales and service footprint worldwide and expand our Supercharging network. With the continued global expansion of our customer support and Supercharger infrastructure, selling, general and administrative expenses were $195.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2015, compared to $117.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014.

Management Opportunities, Challenges and Risks

Orders, Production and Deliveries

During the last several months, we have broadened the appeal of Model S by introducing all-wheel drive vehicles and Model S 70D.  In addition, we remain on track to introduce Model X late in the third quarter of this year.  We expect that demand for our vehicles will continue to increase worldwide as more people drive and become aware of our vehicles, as we grow our customer support infrastructure, and as we continue to develop our products.

In order to meet this anticipated demand for both Model S and Model X, we are executing a plan to increase our combined Model S and Model X production capacity to over 2,000 units per week by the end of 2015. In August 2014, we began our production ramp by transitioning to our new final assembly line and upgrading our body center. We are continuing to make further investment in production capacity during 2015, including building a new paint shop, a new body shop for Model X, and additional stamping capacity. We expect our annual production will increase by over 50% each year for the next several years. In addition, scaling our deliveries entails that we increase the number of customer-configured cars in-transit.  We therefore expect production to increase faster than deliveries, resulting in higher finished goods inventory.

Our recent production capacity expansion contributed to average weekly production in excess of 1,000 vehicles per week during the first quarter of 2015, considering the planned shutdown of production during the first week of the year. During 2015, we plan to achieve significant efficiencies in Model S production and begin production of Model X with the intent of achieving a significantly faster initial production ramp than we achieved with Model S. The introduction of Model X into our existing production process will add significant complexity and may affect our ability to initially meet future efficiency and delivery targets.

19


 

In addition to expanding our production, we expect to continue to lower the cost of manufacturing our vehicles and improve our gross margin. Significant cost improvements for Model S were achieved in 2014, including material cost reductions from both engineering and commercial actions, as well as manufacturing efficiencies. We expect that this trend will continue as we execute on our roadmap. We expect that such improvements will allow us to significantly improve our gross margin excluding the impact of foreign currency movements. During our product introductions in 2014, we incurred manufacturing inefficiencies which negatively impacted our gross margin. When we introduce Model X, we expect that both production inefficiencies and supply chain inefficiencies typical of a new product introduction will suppress Model X margins for at least a few quarters after its introduction. If we are not able to achieve the planned cost reductions from our various cost savings and process improvement initiatives or introduce Model X efficiently, our ability to reach our gross margin goals would be negatively affected.

We expect to deliver approximately 55,000 Model S and X vehicles worldwide in 2015, which is about 74% more deliveries than we achieved in 2014. To support this growth, we plan to continue to expand our Supercharger, stores and service infrastructure worldwide as well as to provide better service in areas with a high concentration of Model S customers. As we now offer Model S in many countries within North America, Europe and Asia, our expansion will primarily occur in geographic areas in which we already have a presence. Based on our current projections, we expect our long-term sales outside of North America will be almost half of our worldwide automotive revenue. Despite initial challenges in China, we plan to continue to invest in our infrastructure in China as we believe that the country could be one of our largest markets within a few years. However, as compared to markets in the United States and Europe, we have relatively limited experience in China and other Asian markets; thus, we may face continuing difficulties meeting our future expansion plans in Asia.

Trends in Capital Expenditures and Operating Expenses

Our capital expenditures and operating expenses have significantly increased in the past year. As we continue to invest in the long term growth of Tesla, capital spending and operating expenses will continue to increase, but at a more moderate pace than in 2014. During 2015, capital expenditures are expected to be about $1.5 billion as we expand production capacity, complete Model X development, and continue to build the Gigafactory and expand our stores and service centers, as well as continue other product development programs, including Model 3.

Our operating expenses will continue to grow in 2015, but at less than half the pace of growth in 2014. Our R&D expenses in particular will continue to increase as we complete the development, validation, and testing of Model X and accelerate design and engineering work on Model 3. Growth of sales, general and administrative expenses will be more modest as we will be particularly focused on increasing operational efficiency while we continue to expand our customer and corporate infrastructure. Over time, we expect overall operating expenses to decrease as a percentage of revenue.

As of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, the net book value of our Supercharger network was $128.5 million and $107.8 million and currently includes 425 locations globally. We plan to continue investing in our Supercharger network for the foreseeable future, including in North America, Europe and Asia and expect such spending to be approximately 5% of total capital spending over the next 12 months. During 2015, this investment will grow our Supercharger network by about 50%. We allocate Supercharger related expenses to cost of automotive revenues and selling, general, and administrative expenses. These costs were immaterial for all periods presented.

Customer Financing Options

We offer loans and leases in North America, Europe and Asia primarily through various financial institutions. We offer a resale value guarantee in connection with certain loans offered by financial institutions and provide this guarantee to approximately 11,760 Model S customers. We expanded this program to selected European and Asian markets this quarter. Model S deliveries with the resale value guarantee currently do not impact our near-term cash flows and liquidity, since we receive the full amount of cash for the vehicle sales price at delivery. However, this program requires the deferral of revenues and costs into future periods under lease accounting. Although lease accounting will continue to impact our revenues and operating results in the period cars are sold under this and similar programs, as time passes, the amortization of existing deferred revenues and costs will begin to partially offset this adverse impact. Furthermore, while we do not assume any credit risk related to the customer, we are exposed to the risk that a vehicle’s resale value may be lower than our estimates and the volume of vehicles returned to us may be higher than our estimates which could adversely impact our cash flows.

20


 

We currently offer leases in the U.S. directly from Tesla Finance, our captive financing entity, as well as through a banking partner. Leasing through Tesla Finance is now available in 37 states, the District of Columbia and in 4 provinces of Canada. Through March 31, 2015, we have leased approximately 1,740 vehicles through Tesla Finance and approximately 900 vehicles through our banking partner. Leasing through both Tesla Finance and our banking partner exposes us to residual value risk and will adversely impact our near-term revenues and operating results by requiring the deferral of revenues and costs into future periods under lease accounting. In addition, for leases offered directly from Tesla Finance (but not for those offered through our bank partner), we will not receive the full amount of the cash for the vehicle price at delivery and will assume customer credit risk. We plan to continue expanding our leasing offerings.

We have set the residual values given to our customers under our resale value guarantee program at what we estimate will be the trade-in value of these vehicles at the end of the term of the option. Based on current market demand for our cars, we estimate the resale prices for our vehicles will continue to be above our resale value guarantee amounts. Should market values or customer demand decrease, these estimates may be impacted materially.

The Tesla Gigafactory

We are building the Tesla Gigafactory, a facility where we intend to work together with our suppliers to integrate battery precursor material, cell, module and battery pack production in one location. In June 2014, we broke ground on the Gigafactory outside of Reno, Nevada. Construction continued during the first quarter of 2015 with plans that the first cells will be produced in 2016.

We will prepare and provide the land, buildings and utilities for the Gigafactory, invest in production equipment for battery cell, module and pack production and be responsible for the overall management of the Gigafactory and we will engage with partners who have significant experience in battery cell production. We have partnered with Panasonic to manufacture and supply us with battery cells and we anticipate bringing on additional partners to create a fully integrated industrial complex. Although planning discussions with production and supply chain partners continue to progress, to-date we have not formalized any agreements with any other partners. Given the size and complexity of this undertaking, the cost of building and operating the Gigafactory could exceed our current expectations and the Gigafactory may take longer to bring online than we anticipate.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our condensed consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, costs and expenses and related disclosures. We base our estimates on historical experience, as appropriate, and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Changes in the accounting estimates are reasonably likely to occur from period to period. Accordingly, actual results could differ significantly from the estimates made by our management. We evaluate our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. To the extent that there are material differences between these estimates and actual results, our future financial statement presentation, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows will be affected.

For a description of our critical accounting policies and estimates, please refer to the “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” section of our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). In addition, please refer to Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” to our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements included under Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Results of Operations

Revenues

Automotive revenue includes revenues related to deliveries of new Model S, including internet connectivity, Supercharging access, and specified software updates for cars equipped with Autopilot hardware, as well as sales of regulatory credits to other automotive manufacturers, amortization of revenue for cars sold with resale value guarantees, and Model S leasing revenue. Services and other revenue consists of sales of electric vehicle powertrain components and systems to other manufacturers, maintenance and development services, Tesla Energy, and pre-owned Tesla vehicle sales.

Automotive revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2015, were $893.3 million, an increase from $588.9 million during the three months ended March 31, 2014. The increase was primarily driven by the ramp in Model S deliveries. For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, automotive revenue includes $53.7 million and $23.7 million from the accretion of the deferred revenues from our resale value guarantee and other similar programs, as well as Model S leasing.

21


 

Service and other revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $46.6 million, an increase from $31.7 million during the three months ended March 31, 2014 related primarily to increases in maintenance service revenue and powertrain sales.

Cost of Revenues and Gross Profit

Cost of revenues includes direct parts, material and labor costs, manufacturing overhead, including amortized tooling costs, royalty fees, shipping and logistic costs and reserves for estimated warranty expenses. Cost of revenues also includes adjustments to warranty expense and charges to write down the carrying value of our inventory when it exceeds its estimated net realizable value and to provide for obsolete and on-hand inventory in excess of forecasted demand.

Cost of automotive revenues during the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $679.8 million, an increase from $465.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. The increase in cost of automotive revenues was driven primarily by increased Model S deliveries. In the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, we recognized $24.9 million and $14.5 million in cost of automotive revenues related to vehicle depreciation for cars accounted for as operating leases. For cars accounted for as leases our warranty reserves do not include projected warranty costs as such actual warranty costs are expensed as incurred. For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, warranty costs incurred for our lease vehicles were $1.8 million and $1.2 million.

Cost of services and other revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $48.1 million, an increase from $29.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. The increase in cost of services and other revenues was driven primarily by increased cost associated powertrain sales to Daimler and maintenance services.

Gross profit for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 were $260.1 million and $155.1 million. Gross margin for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 were 27.7% and 25.0%. The increase in gross profit from 2014 to 2015 was primarily due to manufacturing efficiencies, vehicle cost reductions, and favorable product mix, as well as higher regulatory credit sales, partially offset by increased warranty reserve estimates. Services and other gross margin was negative 3.2%, which was primarily driven by a planned price reduction for powertrain sales to Daimler.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development (R&D) expenses consist primarily of personnel costs for our teams in engineering and research, supply chain, quality, manufacturing engineering and manufacturing test organizations, prototyping expense, contract and professional services and amortized equipment expense. Also included in R&D expenses are development services costs that we incur, if any, prior to the finalization of agreements with our development services customers as reaching a final agreement and revenue recognition is not assured. Development services costs incurred after the finalization of an agreement are recorded in cost of revenues.

R&D expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $167.2 million, an increase from $81.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. The increase in R&D expenses consisted primarily of a $39.8 million increase in expensed materials primarily to support our Model X development, Autopilot, and other Model S improvements, a $22.7 million increase in employee compensation expenses,  a $10.4 million increase in costs related to Model X, Autopilot, and dual motor powertrain engineering, design and testing activities, and a $5.9 million increase in stock-based compensation expense related to increased headcount and increasing values of awards granted.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Selling, general and administrative (SG&A) expenses consist primarily of personnel and facilities costs related to our Tesla stores, marketing, sales, executive, finance, human resources, information technology and legal organizations, as well as litigation settlements and fees for professional and contract services.

SG&A expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2015 were $195.4 million, an increase from $117.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. SG&A expenses increased primarily from higher headcount and costs to support an expanded retail, service and Supercharger footprint as well as the general growth of the business. The $77.8 million increase in our SG&A expenses consisted primarily of a $36.5 million increase in office, information technology and facilities-related costs to support the growth of our business as well as sales and marketing activities to handle our expanding market presence, a $33.3 million increase in employee compensation expenses related to higher sales and marketing headcount to support sales activities worldwide and higher general and administrative headcount to support the expansion of the business,  and a $9.9 million increase in professional and outside services costs.

22


 

Interest Expense

Interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 was $26.6 million and $11.9 million. The increase in interest expense from 2014 to 2015 was due to the issuance of $920.0 million aggregate principal amount of 2019 Notes and $1.38 billion aggregate principal amount of 2021 Notes during the first half of 2014.

Other Income (Expense), Net

Other income (expense), net, consists primarily of foreign exchange gains and losses related to our foreign currency-denominated assets and liabilities. We expect our foreign exchange gains and losses will vary depending upon movements in the underlying exchange rates.

Other expense, net, during the three months ended March 31, 2015 was $22.3 million, as compared to $6.7 million other income during the three months ended March 31, 2014. The increase in our other expense, net, is primarily attributable to a $21.7 million unfavorable foreign currency exchange impact from our foreign currency-denominated assets and liabilities, primarily unsettled intercompany balances and cash held in foreign currencies.

Provision for Income Taxes

Our provision for income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 was $3.0 million and $0.8 million. The increases in the provision for income taxes were due primarily to the increase in taxable income in our international jurisdictions.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of March 31, 2015, we had $1.51 billion in principal sources of liquidity available from our cash and cash equivalents including $874.3 million of money market funds. Amounts held in foreign currencies had a U.S. dollar equivalent of $408 million as of March 31, 2015, and consisted primarily of Norwegian krone, Japanese yen, euro, and Chinese yuan.

Sources of cash are predominately from our deliveries of Model S, as well as customer deposits for Model S and Model X, sales of regulatory credits, and sales of powertrain components and systems. We expect that our current sources of liquidity, including cash and cash equivalents, together with our current projections of cash flow from operating activities, will provide us with adequate liquidity over the next 12 months based on our current plans. These cash flows enable us to fund our ongoing operations, research and development projects for our planned Model X, Model 3, and certain other future products; purchase tooling and manufacturing equipment required to introduce Model X and to continue to ramp up production of Model S; construct our Gigafactory; and establish and expand our stores, service centers and Supercharger network. We currently anticipate making aggregate capital expenditures of about $1.5 billion during 2015.

When market conditions are favorable, we may evaluate alternatives to pursue liquidity options to fund capital intensive initiatives. Should prevailing economic, financial, business or other factors adversely affect our ability to meet our operating cash requirements, we could be required to obtain funding though traditional or alternative sources of financing. We cannot be certain that additional funds would be available to us on favorable terms when required, or at all.

Summary of Cash Flows

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

$

(131,794

)

 

$

58,723

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(432,344

)

 

 

(329,180

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

186,156