Tesla Motors
Tesla, Inc. (Form: 10-Q, Received: 08/04/2017 17:19:05)

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number: 001-34756

Tesla, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

91-2197729

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

3500 Deer Creek Road

Palo Alto, California

 

94304

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(650) 681-5000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes       No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes       No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes       No  

As of July 31, 2017, there were 166,887,023 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

TESLA, INC.

FORM 10-Q FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JUNE 30, 2017

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I.

 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

4

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

4

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

5

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss

 

6

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

7

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

8

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

30

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

38

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

39

 

 

 

 

 

PART II.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

40

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

41

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

56

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

56

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

56

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

56

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

56

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

57

 

 

 

 

 


 

Forward-Looking Statements

The discussions in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contain forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements concerning our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, projected costs, profitability, expected cost reductions, capital adequacy, expectations regarding demand and acceptance for our technologies, growth opportunities and trends in the market in which we operate, prospects and plans and objectives of management. The words “anticipates”, “believes”, “could”, “estimates”, “expects”, “intends”, “may”, “might”, “plans”, “projects”, “will”, “would” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in these forward-looking statements, and you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results or events to differ materially from the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in these forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the risks set forth in Part II, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements.

 

 

 

 

 


 

P ART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Tesla, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in thousands, except for par values)

(unaudited)

 

  

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

3,035,924

 

 

$

3,393,216

 

Restricted cash

 

 

118,369

 

 

 

105,519

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

453,539

 

 

 

499,142

 

Inventory

 

 

2,438,111

 

 

 

2,067,454

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

313,501

 

 

 

194,465

 

Total current assets

 

 

6,359,444

 

 

 

6,259,796

 

Operating lease vehicles, net

 

 

3,600,821

 

 

 

3,134,080

 

Solar energy systems, leased and to be leased, net

 

 

6,218,504

 

 

 

5,919,880

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

 

8,399,229

 

 

 

5,982,957

 

Intangible assets, net

 

 

380,847

 

 

 

376,145

 

Goodwill

 

 

43,766

 

 

 

 

MyPower customer notes receivable, net of current portion

 

 

472,663

 

 

 

506,302

 

Restricted cash, net of current portion

 

 

358,445

 

 

 

268,165

 

Other assets

 

 

209,986

 

 

 

216,751

 

Total assets

 

$

26,043,705

 

 

$

22,664,076

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

2,359,316

 

 

$

1,860,341

 

Accrued liabilities and other

 

 

1,510,744

 

 

 

1,210,028

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

913,398

 

 

 

763,126

 

Resale value guarantees

 

 

342,824

 

 

 

179,504

 

Customer deposits

 

 

603,540

 

 

 

663,859

 

Current portion of long-term debt and capital leases

 

 

716,533

 

 

 

984,211

 

Current portion of solar bonds and promissory notes issued to related parties

 

 

100,000

 

 

 

165,936

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

6,546,355

 

 

 

5,827,005

 

Long-term debt and capital leases, net of current portion

 

 

7,122,862

 

 

 

5,860,049

 

Solar bonds issued to related parties, net of current portion

 

 

100

 

 

 

99,164

 

Convertible senior notes issued to related parties

 

 

2,444

 

 

 

10,287

 

Deferred revenue, net of current portion

 

 

1,035,579

 

 

 

851,790

 

Resale value guarantees, net of current portion

 

 

2,493,024

 

 

 

2,210,423

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

2,259,538

 

 

 

1,891,449

 

Total liabilities

 

 

19,459,902

 

 

 

16,750,167

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 14)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries

 

 

367,377

 

 

 

367,039

 

Convertible senior notes (Notes 11)

 

 

1,688

 

 

 

8,784

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock; $0.001 par value; 100,000 shares authorized; no shares

   issued and outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock; $0.001 par value; 2,000,000 shares authorized; 166,863 and 161,561

   shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

 

163

 

 

 

161

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

8,774,212

 

 

 

7,773,727

 

Accumulated other comprehensive gain (loss)

 

 

10,961

 

 

 

(23,740

)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(3,679,584

)

 

 

(2,997,237

)

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

5,105,752

 

 

 

4,752,911

 

Noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries

 

 

1,108,986

 

 

 

785,175

 

Total liabilities and equity

 

$

26,043,705

 

 

$

22,664,076

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 

4


 

Tesla, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(in thousands, except per share data)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automotive sales

 

$

2,013,852

 

 

$

1,030,224

 

 

$

4,048,912

 

 

$

1,932,116

 

Automotive leasing

 

 

272,764

 

 

 

151,628

 

 

 

527,304

 

 

 

275,800

 

Total automotive revenues

 

 

2,286,616

 

 

 

1,181,852

 

 

 

4,576,216

 

 

 

2,207,916

 

Energy generation and storage

 

 

286,780

 

 

 

3,947

 

 

 

500,724

 

 

 

26,675

 

Services and other

 

 

216,161

 

 

 

84,218

 

 

 

408,887

 

 

 

182,474

 

Total revenues

 

 

2,789,557

 

 

 

1,270,017

 

 

 

5,485,827

 

 

 

2,417,065

 

Cost of revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Automotive sales

 

 

1,472,578

 

 

 

827,231

 

 

 

2,969,227

 

 

 

1,540,380

 

Automotive leasing

 

 

175,433

 

 

 

82,051

 

 

 

341,459

 

 

 

148,218

 

Total automotive cost of revenues

 

 

1,648,011

 

 

 

909,282

 

 

 

3,310,686

 

 

 

1,688,598

 

Energy generation and storage

 

 

203,762

 

 

 

8,159

 

 

 

355,535

 

 

 

26,272

 

Services and other

 

 

271,169

 

 

 

77,800

 

 

 

485,045

 

 

 

174,951

 

Total cost of revenues

 

 

2,122,942

 

 

 

995,241

 

 

 

4,151,266

 

 

 

1,889,821

 

Gross profit

 

 

666,615

 

 

 

274,776

 

 

 

1,334,561

 

 

 

527,244

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

369,774

 

 

 

191,664

 

 

 

691,814

 

 

 

374,146

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

537,757

 

 

 

321,152

 

 

 

1,141,212

 

 

 

639,362

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

907,531

 

 

 

512,816

 

 

 

1,833,026

 

 

 

1,013,508

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(240,916

)

 

 

(238,040

)

 

 

(498,465

)

 

 

(486,264

)

Interest income

 

 

4,785

 

 

 

2,242

 

 

 

7,875

 

 

 

3,493

 

Interest expense

 

 

(108,441

)

 

 

(46,368

)

 

 

(207,787

)

 

 

(86,993

)

Other (expense) income, net

 

 

(41,208

)

 

 

(7,373

)

 

 

(59,306

)

 

 

1,804

 

Loss before income taxes

 

 

(385,780

)

 

 

(289,539

)

 

 

(757,683

)

 

 

(567,960

)

Provision for income taxes

 

 

15,647

 

 

 

3,649

 

 

 

40,925

 

 

 

7,495

 

Net loss

 

 

(401,427

)

 

 

(293,188

)

 

 

(798,608

)

 

 

(575,455

)

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests and

   redeemable noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries

 

 

(65,030

)

 

 

 

 

 

(131,934

)

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

 

$

(336,397

)

 

$

(293,188

)

 

$

(666,674

)

 

$

(575,455

)

Net loss per share of common stock attributable to common

   stockholders, basic and diluted

 

$

(2.04

)

 

$

(2.09

)

 

$

(4.07

)

 

$

(4.22

)

Weighted average shares used in computing net loss per share

   of common stock, basic and diluted

 

 

165,212

 

 

 

139,983

 

 

 

163,679

 

 

 

136,330

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 

5


 

Tesla, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

 

$

(336,397

)

 

$

(293,188

)

 

$

(666,674

)

 

$

(575,455

)

Unrealized gain (loss) on derivatives:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in net unrealized gain

 

 

 

 

 

22,928

 

 

 

 

 

 

43,733

 

Less: Reclassification adjustment for net losses into

   net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5,570

)

 

 

 

Net unrealized gain (loss) on derivatives

 

 

 

 

 

22,928

 

 

 

(5,570

)

 

 

43,733

 

Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 

31,730

 

 

 

(2,300

)

 

 

40,271

 

 

 

(5,984

)

Other comprehensive income

 

 

31,730

 

 

 

20,628

 

 

 

34,701

 

 

 

37,749

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(304,667

)

 

$

(272,560

)

 

$

(631,973

)

 

$

(537,706

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 

6


 

Tesla, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Cash Flows From Operating Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(798,608

)

 

$

(575,455

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

765,773

 

 

 

339,692

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

219,759

 

 

 

156,969

 

Amortization of debt discounts

 

 

64,151

 

 

 

41,696

 

Inventory write-downs

 

 

71,255

 

 

 

29,725

 

Loss on disposal of property and equipment

 

 

53,572

 

 

 

11,563

 

Foreign currency transaction loss (gain)

 

 

29,394

 

 

 

(8,081

)

Loss on the acquisition of SolarCity

 

 

11,571

 

 

 

 

Non-cash interest and other operating activities

 

 

57,023

 

 

 

16,167

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effect of business combinations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

77,043

 

 

 

(1,426

)

Inventories and operating lease vehicles

 

 

(1,121,155

)

 

 

(1,217,931

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(113,192

)

 

 

19,494

 

MyPower customer notes receivable and other assets

 

 

26,339

 

 

 

(7,447

)

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

 

13,234

 

 

 

212,949

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

208,685

 

 

 

165,144

 

Customer deposits

 

 

(71,064

)

 

 

398,555

 

Resale value guarantee

 

 

176,505

 

 

 

253,710

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

59,732

 

 

 

65,407

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(269,983

)

 

 

(99,269

)

Cash Flows From Investing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment excluding capital leases, net of sales

 

 

(1,511,692

)

 

 

(511,579

)

Maturities of short-term marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

16,667

 

Purchase of solar energy systems, leased and to be leased

 

 

(418,792

)

 

 

 

Increase in restricted cash

 

 

(102,528

)

 

 

(58,761

)

Business combination, net of cash acquired

 

 

(109,147

)

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(2,142,159

)

 

 

(553,673

)

Cash Flows From Financing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock in public offering

 

 

400,175

 

 

 

1,701,734

 

Proceeds from issuance of convertible and other debt

 

 

2,408,586

 

 

 

1,108,000

 

Repayments of convertible and other debt

 

 

(1,412,286

)

 

 

(578,683

)

Repayments of borrowings under solar bonds issued to related parties

 

 

(165,000

)

 

 

 

Collateralized lease borrowings

 

 

335,675

 

 

 

384,525

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options and other stock issuances

 

 

158,913

 

 

 

110,478

 

Principal payments on capital leases

 

 

(36,857

)

 

 

(18,270

)

Common stock and debt issuance costs

 

 

(13,688

)

 

 

(15,765

)

Purchase of convertible note hedges

 

 

(204,102

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from settlement of convertible note hedges

 

 

251,850

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of warrants

 

 

52,883

 

 

 

 

Payments for settlement of warrants

 

 

(208,193

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from investment by noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries

 

 

583,433

 

 

 

 

Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries

 

 

(123,873

)

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

2,027,516

 

 

 

2,692,019

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

 

27,334

 

 

 

10,316

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(357,292

)

 

 

2,049,393

 

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

 

 

3,393,216

 

 

 

1,196,908

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

 

$

3,035,924

 

 

$

3,246,301

 

Supplemental noncash investing and financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of property and equipment included in liabilities

 

$

1,021,692

 

 

$

324,982

 

Estimated fair value of facilities under build-to-suit leases

 

$

173,075

 

 

$

172,770

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

7


 

Tesla, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

Note 1 – Overview

Tesla, Inc. (“Tesla”, the “Company”, “we”, “us” or “our”) was incorporated in the State of Delaware on July 1, 2003. We design, develop, manufacture and sell high-performance fully electric vehicles and design, manufacture, install and sell solar energy generation and energy storage products. Our Chief Executive Officer, as the chief operating decision maker (“CODM”), organizes the Company, manages resource allocations and measures performance among two segments: (i) automotive and (ii) energy generation and storage.

 

Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Unaudited Interim Financial Statements

The consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2017, the consolidated statements of operations and the consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 and the consolidated statements of cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, as well as other information disclosed in the accompanying notes, are unaudited. The consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2016 was derived from the audited consolidated financial statements as of that date. The interim consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes should be read in conjunction with the annual consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016.

The interim consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes have been prepared on the same basis as the annual consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results of operations for the periods presented. The consolidated results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or for any other future years or interim periods.

Reclassifications

Certain prior period balances have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation in the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes. Such reclassifications had no effect on previously reported results of operations. Starting in the fourth quarter of 2016, we have reclassified the revenue and cost of revenue of our energy storage products from ‘services and other’ into ‘energy generation and storage’ for all periods presented in order to align with our reportable segments.

Resale Value Guarantees and Other Financing Programs

Vehicle sales to customers with a resale value guarantee

Prior to June 30, 2016, we offered resale value guarantees or similar buy-back terms to all customers who purchase vehicles and who financed their vehicles through one of our specified commercial banking partners. Since June   30, 2016, this program is available only in certain international markets. Under this program, customers have the option of selling their vehicle back to us during the guarantee period for a determined resale value. Guarantee periods generally range from 36 to 39 months. Although we receive full payment for the vehicle sales price at the time of delivery, we are required to account for these transactions as operating leases. The amount of sale proceeds equal to the resale value guarantee is deferred until the guarantee expires or is exercised. The remaining sale proceeds are deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the stated guarantee period to automotive leasing revenue. The guarantee period expires at the earlier of the end of the guarantee period or the pay-off of the initial loan. We capitalize the cost of these vehicles on the consolidated balance sheets as operating lease vehicles, net, and depreciate their value, less salvage value, to cost of automotive leasing revenue over the same period.

In cases where a customer retains ownership of a vehicle at the end of the guarantee period, the resale value guarantee liability and any remaining deferred revenue balances related to the vehicle are settled to automotive leasing revenue and the net book value of the leased vehicle is expensed to costs of automotive leasing revenue. If a customer returns the vehicle to us during the guarantee period, we purchase the vehicle from the customer in an amount equal to the resale value guarantee and settle any remaining deferred balances to automotive leasing revenue, and we reclassify the net book value of the vehicle on our balance sheet to pre-owned vehicle inventory. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, $222.9 million and $179.5 million, respectively, of the guarantees were exercisable by customers within a 12-month period from each such date.

8


 

Vehicle sales to leasing partners with a resale value guarantee

We also offer resale value guarantees in connection with automobile sales to certain leasing partners. As we have guaranteed the value of these vehicles and as the vehicles are leased to end-customers, we account for these transactions as interest bearing collateralized borrowings as required under ASC 840, Leases . Under this program, cash is received for the full price of the vehicle and is recorded within resale value guarantees for the long-term portion and deferred revenue for the current portion. We accrete the deferred revenue amount to automotive leasing revenue on a straight-line basis over the guarantee period and accrue interest expense based on our borrowing rate. We capitalize vehicles under this program to operating lease vehicles, net, on the consolidated balance sheets, and we record depreciation from these vehicles to cost of automotive leasing revenues during the period the vehicle is under a lease arrangement. Cash received for these vehicles, net of revenue recognized during the period, is classified as collateralized lease borrowings within cash flows from financing activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows.

At the end of the lease term, we settle our liability in cash by either purchasing the vehicle from the leasing partner for the resale value guarantee amount or paying a shortfall to the guarantee amount the leasing partner may realize on the sale of the vehicle. Any remaining balances within deferred revenue and resale value guarantee will be settled to automotive leasing revenue. In cases where the leasing partner retains ownership of the vehicle after the end of our guarantee period, we expense the net value of the leased vehicle to costs of automotive leasing revenue . The maximum amount we could be required to pay under this program, should we decide to repurchase all vehicles, was $1.09   billion as of June 30, 2017, including $119.9 million within a 12-month period from such date .

As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, we had $1.48 billion and $ 1.18 billion , respectively, of such borrowings recorded in resale value guarantees and $342.1   million and $ 289.1  million, respectively, recorded in deferred revenue liability . As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, we had a total of $47.1 million and $57.0 million, respectively, in account receivables from our leasing partners .

On a quarterly basis, we assess the estimated market values of vehicles under our resale value guarantee program to determine if we have sustained a loss on any of these contracts. As we accumulate more data related to the resale values of our vehicles or as market conditions change, there may be material changes to their estimated values.

9


 

Activity related to our resale value guarantee and similar programs consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

  

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Operating Lease Vehicles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease vehicles—beginning of period

 

$

2,732,399

 

 

$

1,909,310

 

 

$

2,462,061

 

 

$

1,556,529

 

Net increase in operating lease vehicles

 

 

252,553

 

 

 

291,036

 

 

 

666,914

 

 

 

705,017

 

Depreciation expense recorded in cost

   of automotive leasing revenues

 

 

(93,161

)

 

 

(57,568

)

 

 

(172,017

)

 

 

(102,386

)

Additional depreciation expense recorded in cost

   of automotive leasing revenues as a result of

   early cancellation of resale value guarantee

 

 

(3,792

)

 

 

(2,571

)

 

 

(12,215

)

 

 

(5,657

)

Additional depreciation expense recorded in cost

   of automotive leasing revenues result of

   expiration

 

 

(31,467

)

 

 

 

 

 

(72,899

)

 

 

 

Increases to inventory from vehicles returned

   under our trade-in program and exercises of

   resale value guarantee

 

 

(20,868

)

 

 

(13,626

)

 

 

(36,180

)

 

 

(26,922

)

Operating lease vehicles—end of period

 

$

2,835,664

 

 

$

2,126,581

 

 

$

2,835,664

 

 

$

2,126,581

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue—beginning of period

 

$

1,010,502

 

 

$

800,968

 

 

$

916,652

 

 

$

679,132

 

Net increase in deferred revenue from new vehicle

   deliveries and reclassification of collateralized

   borrowing from long-term to short-term

 

 

166,176

 

 

 

165,875

 

 

 

404,863

 

 

 

391,639

 

Amortization of deferred revenue and short-term

   collateralized borrowing recorded in automotive

   leasing revenue

 

 

(165,518

)

 

 

(108,852

)

 

 

(303,186

)

 

 

(206,600

)

Additional revenue recorded in automotive leasing

   revenue as a result of early cancellation of resale

   value guarantee

 

 

(615

)

 

 

(3,424

)

 

 

(2,352

)

 

 

(6,420

)

Recognition of deferred revenue resulting from

   return of vehicle under trade-in program,

   expiration, and exercises of resale value

   guarantee

 

 

(3,945

)

 

 

(2,883

)

 

 

(9,377

)

 

 

(6,067

)

Deferred revenue—end of period

 

$

1,006,600

 

 

$

851,684

 

 

$

1,006,600

 

 

$

851,684

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resale Value Guarantee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resale value guarantee liability—beginning of

   period

 

$

2,692,593

 

 

$

1,775,498

 

 

$

2,389,927

 

 

$

1,430,573

 

Increase in resale value guarantee

 

 

143,598

 

 

 

270,436

 

 

 

562,319

 

 

 

651,935

 

Reclassification from long-term to short-term

   collateralized borrowing

 

 

(67,097

)

 

 

(23,216

)

 

 

(115,481

)

 

 

(46,042

)

Additional revenue recorded in automotive

   leasing revenue as a result of early cancellation

   of resale value guarantee

 

 

(2,106

)

 

 

(3,318

)

 

 

(8,248

)

 

 

(5,819

)

Release of resale value guarantee resulting from

   return of vehicle under trade-in program and

   exercises

 

 

(19,634

)

 

 

(12,053

)

 

 

(39,833

)

 

 

(23,300

)

Release of resale value guarantee resulting from

   expiration of resale value guarantee

 

 

(31,394

)

 

 

 

 

 

(72,724

)

 

 

 

Resale value guarantee liability—end of period

 

$

2,715,960

 

 

$

2,007,347

 

 

$

2,715,960

 

 

$

2,007,347

 

Income Taxes

There are transactions that occur during the ordinary course of business for which the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the aggregate balances of our gross unrecognized tax benefits were $235.0 million and

10


 

$203.9 million, respectively, of which $ 228.2  million and $198.3 million, respectively, would not give rise to changes in our effective tax rate sinc e these tax benefits would increase a deferred tax asset that is currently fully offset by a valuation allowance .

Net Loss per Share of Common Stock Attributable to Common Stockholders

Basic net income (loss) per share of common stock attributable to common stockholders is calculated by dividing net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding for the period. Potentially dilutive shares, which are based on the weighted-average shares of common stock underlying outstanding stock-based awards, warrants and convertible senior notes using the treasury stock method or the if-converted method, as applicable, are included when calculating diluted net income (loss) per share of common stock attributable to common stockholders when their effect is dilutive. Since we expect to settle in cash the principal outstanding under the 0.25% Convertible Senior Notes due in 2019, the 1.25% Convertible Senior Notes due in 2021 and the 2.375% Convertible Senior Notes due in 2022, we use the treasury stock method when calculating their potential dilutive effect, if any. The following table presents the potentially dilutive shares that were excluded from the computation of diluted net income (loss) per share of common stock attributable to common stockholders, because their effect was anti-dilutive:

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Stock-based awards

 

 

9,038,397

 

 

 

11,345,742

 

 

 

10,434,764

 

 

 

13,538,610

 

Convertible senior notes

 

 

2,792,247

 

 

 

2,345,823

 

 

 

2,972,278

 

 

 

2,150,258

 

Warrants

 

 

801,673

 

 

 

998,101

 

 

 

736,567

 

 

 

702,123

 

Concentration of Risk

Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject us to a concentration of credit risk consist of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash, accounts receivable and interest rate swaps. Our cash balances are primarily invested in money market funds or on deposit at high credit quality financial institutions in the United States. At times, these deposits may be in excess of insured limits. As of June 30, 2017, no customer represented 10% or more of our total accounts receivable balance. As of December 31, 2016, one customer represented 10% or more of our total accounts receivable balance. The risk of concentration for our interest rate swaps is mitigated by transacting with several highly rated multinational banks. We maintain reserves for any amounts that we consider uncollectible.

Supply Risk

We are dependent on our suppliers, the majority of which are single source suppliers, and the inability of these suppliers to deliver necessary components of our products in a timely manner at prices, quality levels and volumes acceptable to us, or our inability to efficiently manage these components from these suppliers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results.

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Warranties

We provide a manufacturer’s warranty on all new and certified pre-owned vehicles, production powertrain components and systems and energy products we sell. In addition, we also provide a warranty on the installation and components of the solar energy systems we sell for periods typically between 10 to 30 years. We accrue a warranty reserve for the products sold by us, which includes our best estimate of the projected costs to repair or replace items under warranty. These estimates are based on actual claims incurred to date and an estimate of the nature, frequency and costs of future claims. These estimates are inherently uncertain given our relatively short history of sales, and changes to our historical or projected warranty experience may cause material changes to the warranty reserve in the future. In addition, during the three months ended June 30, 2017, we recorded an $8.9 million increase to the accrued warranty balance as a result of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. The warranty reserve does not include projected warranty costs associated with our vehicles subject to lease accounting and our solar energy systems under lease contracts or power purchase agreements, as the costs to repair these warranty claims are expensed as incurred. The portion of the warranty reserve expected to be incurred within the next 12 months is included within accrued liabilities and other while the remaining balance is included within other long-term liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets. Warranty expense is recorded as a component of cost of revenues. Accrued warranty activity consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Accrued warranty—beginning of period

 

$

306,951

 

 

$

198,705

 

 

$

266,655

 

 

$

180,754

 

Warranty costs incurred

 

 

(25,384

)

 

 

(24,459

)

 

 

(48,400

)

 

 

(40,163

)

Net changes in liability for pre-existing warranties,

   including expirations and foreign exchange impact

 

 

8,915

 

 

 

3,250

 

 

 

2,653

 

 

 

6,634

 

Provision for warranty

 

 

52,797

 

 

 

38,963

 

 

 

122,371

 

 

 

69,234

 

Accrued warranty—end of period

 

$

343,279

 

 

$

216,459

 

 

$

343,279

 

 

$

216,459

 

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, warranty costs incurred for vehicles accounted for as operating leases or collateralized debt arrangements were $7.4 million and $13.5 million, respectively, and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, such costs were $2.6 million and $5.1 million, respectively.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers , to replace the existing revenue recognition criteria for contracts with customers. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Deferral of the Effective Date , to defer the effective date of ASU No. 2014-09 to interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Subsequently, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-08, Principal versus Agent Considerations , ASU No. 2016-10, Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing , ASU No. 2016-11, Rescission of SEC Guidance Because of Accounting Standards Updates 2014-09 and 2014-16 Pursuant to Staff Announcements at the March 3, 2016 EITF Meeting , ASU No. 2016-12, Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients , and ASU No. 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements , to clarify and amend the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09. We will adopt the ASUs on January 1, 2018. We are continuing to assess the impact of adopting the ASUs on our financial position, results of operations and related disclosures and have not yet determined whether the effect will be material.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases , to require lessees to recognize all leases, with certain exceptions, on the balance sheet, while recognition on the statement of operations will remain similar to current lease accounting. The ASU also eliminates real estate-specific provisions and modifies certain aspects of lessor accounting. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. We currently expect to adopt the ASU on January 1, 2019. We will be required to recognize and measure leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented using a modified retrospective approach, with certain practical expedients available. We intend to elect the available practical expedients upon adoption. Upon adoption, we expect our consolidated balance sheet to include a right of use asset and liability related to substantially all of our lease arrangements. We are continuing to assess the impact of adopting the ASU on our financial position, results of operations and related disclosures and have not yet determined whether the effect will be material.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-06, Contingent Put and Call Options in Debt Instruments , to clarify when a contingent put or call option to accelerate the repayment of debt is an embedded derivative. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is modified retrospective. We adopted the ASU on January 1, 2017, but the ASU did not have an impact on the consolidated financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting , to simplify the accounting for the income tax effects from share-based compensation, the accounting for forfeitures and the accounting for statutory income tax withholding, among others. In particular, the ASU requires all income tax effects from share-based compensation to be recognized in the consolidated statement of operations when the awards vest or are settled, the ASU permits accounting for forfeitures as they occur, and the ASU permits a higher level of statutory income tax withholding without triggering liability

12


 

accounting. Adoption of the ASU is modified retrospectiv e, retrospective and prospective, depending on the specific provision being adopted. We adopted the ASU on January 1, 2017. Our gross U.S. deferred tax assets increased by $909.1 million as a result of our adoption, which was fully offset by a correspondin g increase to our valuation allowance. In addition, we now account for forfeitures as they occur.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments , to reduce the diversity in practice with respect to the classification of certain cash receipts and cash payments on the statement of cash flows. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is retrospective. We are currently obtaining an understanding of the ASU but plan to adopt the ASU on January 1, 2018, which will impact the classifications within the consolidated statements of cash flows.

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-16, Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory , to require the recognition of the income tax effects from an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is modified retrospective. We early adopted the ASU on January 1, 2017. Our adoption did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No.   2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows: Restricted Cash , which requires entities to present the aggregate changes in cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents in the statement of cash flows. As a result, the statement of cash flows will be required to present restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents as a part of the beginning and ending balances of cash and cash equivalents. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is retrospective. We plan to adopt the ASU on January 1, 2018, which will impact the classifications within the consolidated statements of cash flows.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Clarifying the Definition of a Business , to clarify the definition of a business with the objective of assisting entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is prospective. We are currently obtaining an understanding of the ASU and plan to adopt the ASU on January 1, 2018.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment , to simplify the test for goodwill impairment by removing Step 2. An entity will, therefore, perform the goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount, recognizing an impairment charge for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value, not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit. An entity still has the option to perform a qualitative assessment to determine if the quantitative impairment test is necessary. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. Adoption of the ASU is prospective. We have not yet selected an adoption date, and the ASU will have a currently undetermined impact on the consolidated financial statements.

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Scope of Modification Accounting , to provide guidance on which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting. The ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Adoption of the ASU is prospective. We are currently obtaining an understanding of the ASU and plan to adopt the ASU on January 1, 2018.

 

Note 3 – Business Combinations

Grohmann Acquisition

On January 3, 2017, we completed our acquisition of Grohmann Engineering GmbH (now Tesla Grohmann Automation GmbH or “Grohmann”), a company that specializes in the design, development and sale of automated manufacturing systems, for $109.5 million in cash. We acquired Grohmann to improve the speed and efficiency of our manufacturing processes.

At the time of acquisition, we entered into an incentive compensation arrangement for up to a maximum of $25.8 million of payments contingent upon continued service with us for 36 months after the acquisition date. Such payments would have been accounted for as compensation expense in the periods earned. However, during the three months ended March 31, 2017, we terminated the incentive compensation arrangement and accelerated the payments thereunder. As a result, we recorded the entire $25.8 million as compensation expense during the three months ended March 31, 2017, which was included in selling, general and administrative expense in our consolidated statements of operations.

Fair Value of Assets Acquired and Liabilities Assumed

We accounted for the Grohmann acquisition using the purchase method of accounting for business combinations under ASC 805, Business Combinations . The total purchase price is allocated to the tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values as of the acquisition date.

13


 

As we finalize our estimate of the fair value s of the identifiable intangible assets acquired and deferred taxes , additional purchase price adjustments may be recorded during the measurement period (a period not to exceed 12 months) , which may have a material impact on our results of operations and fi nancial position . Fair value estimates are based on a complex series of judgments about future events and uncertainties and rely heavily on estimates and assumptions. The judgments used to determine the estimated fair value assigned to each class of assets acquired and liabilities assumed, as well as asset lives and the expected future cash flows and related discount rates, can materiality impact our results of operations. Significant inputs used included the amount of cash flows, the expected period of the cash flows and the discount rates. There were no changes to the fair values of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed dur ing the three months ended June  30, 2017.

The preliminary allocation of the purchase price is based on management’s estimate of the acquisition date fair values of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed, as follows (in thousands):

 

Assets acquired:

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

334

 

Accounts receivable

 

42,947

 

Inventory

 

10,031

 

Property, plant and equipment

 

44,030

 

Intangible assets

 

21,723

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets, current and non-current

 

1,998

 

Total assets acquired

 

121,063

 

Liabilities assumed: